The Wall Street Journal reported just now that President Barack Obama proposed a $3.8 trillion budget for fiscal 2011.

The budget plan calls for nearly $1 trillion in tax increases on upper-income families — largely by allowing Bush-era tax cuts to expire. Banks, bankers and multinational corporations would face new fees and levies. And oil companies would lose $39 billion in tax breaks.

In all, the president’s budget would add $8.5 trillion to the federal debt through 2020, pushing the debt as a percentage of GDP to 77%, up from 53%.

If you are opposed to the budget (except perhaps for the tax breaks on oil companies), let your representatives know. They think you don’t care about your kids and grand kids.

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The Gravity House

On 2009.09.04, in Politics, Society, by Greg

When I was maybe ten years old, I was driving with my family across the vast expanse of Texas as we had done so many times. On previous such adventures we passed the “Gravity House.” I had always wanted to stop and see the Gravity House but this was the first occasion that I actually asked my Dad if we could stop for what I knew would be a unique experience. I had to beg. Just imagine, a house that defied gravity. That’s what the tens of signs leading up to the location promised. Finally my Dad relented. We all tumbled out and paid the admission. I could hardly contain my enthusiasm. I distinctly remember two things about that day: It was a kind of fraud (the rooms were constructed at an angle such that everything was tilted), and I felt really guilty when I discovered the reality that we had been ripped off.

Since then I’ve experienced that feeling a few times and in each case I thought at the outset that the experience would be worth the price of admission. I get that feeling now when I think about the Congress and White House and those who have voted massive spending all to the purpose of keeping the occupants in power. I get that feeling when I think of the generations that will follow who will have to pay back such massive loans. It’s a bad feeling.

The gravity in Washington has become so powerful that it has become a black hole. I was fooled by the Gravity House once, but vowed never again. The attraction for many citizens to the new Gravity House in Washington is too compelling for them to resist. The Gravity House cost my family a few dollars. I wished at the time that no one else would be fooled by the Gravity House. The difference is not just the trillions of dollars, but that a majority can draw everyone else down with them, never to return from the black hole. We will remember two things about our time: The legislation was a fraud, and we felt really guilty when we discovered the reality that our children and grandchildren were ripped off.

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